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Waid, Doug Dr.

Forest Resources
Professor

229.391.4811
dwaid@abac.edu
Yow Forestry Wildlife 116


Education / Biography

B.Sc. Degree in Wildlife Management, University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point
M.S. Degree in Agriculture, Wildlife Biology, Texas Tech University
Ph.D. Degree in Agriculture, Wildlife Biology, Texas Tech University
Associate Wildlife Biologist, The Wildlife Society

Teaching Philosophy

I have had no technical preparation for a career in teaching and came to this career without what I would consider a definitive philosophy of teaching. Instead, I approach the practice of teaching in any of my classes from the perspective of the students. I try to place myself in their position and consider how I would best be able to comprehend the material being presented. Some people may learn better when they hear information, others by seeing the information in a textual format, some through visual depiction, and some through an applied context. Subsequently, the rate at which material is presented and the extent to which it is elaborated upon is determined, in part, by responses received from students during class dialogues and question and answer sessions.
I expect students to strive to achieve at a level accordant with their classification as freshmen and sophomores in college. This includes the developing the ability for critical thinking, and the ability to synthesize. My intent is not to tell students what to think, but to get them to make the effort, and to do it from a rational and informed position.
I believe that a quality learning experience is best achieved when the subject matter is presented in a manner that makes the experience more agreeable. Maintaining enthusiasm for the material presented, and bringing a sense of amusement to the classroom can help make learning seem less like a task.
I view class discussion on any topic relevant to a student’s career, or life beyond college as time well spent. I believe it helps students understand that learning is a life-long process, and helps them see the connections between what is learned in the classroom and what is happening in the larger world.

Advising Philosophy

My approach to advising reflects my expectations of freshmen and sophomore students In College. The decision to pursue a degree in the Wildlife Technology Program requires a commitment of time and energy on the part of the student to achieve that goal.
To aid my advisees I provide a concise synopsis of the Program which includes 1) an overview of career options for persons who have earned an Associate Degree in Wildlife Technology, 2) the Curriculum for the Program with options for certain courses, and 3) recommendations on scheduling priorities to facilitate meeting any prerequisites, and completing the Program with the least amount of stress and conflict.
I have an ‘open door’ policy and will make myself available for meetings with students before classes begin for the day, after classes have ended, as well as during regular office hours. In addition, since most of my advisees are also my students I provide relevant advising information and updates at the start of my lectures and labs.
I provide encouragement, but when necessary, also admonishment. The success or failure of a student is largely in the hands of that student.

Affiliations & Memberships

Advisor for the ABAC Forestry & Wildlife Club
American Society of Mammalogists
The Wildlife Society, National Organization; Associate Wildlife Biologist
The Wildlife Society, Georgia Chapter (Board Member)

 

Resources

Dendrology

Resources/Links

» Syllabus

Aquatic Resources Management

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» Syllabus

Forest Measurements & Mapping

Resources/Links

» Syllabus

Techniques in Fisheries Management

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» Syllabus

Wildlife Management Techniques

Resources/Links

» Syllabus

Natural Resource Conservation

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» Syllabus

Aquatic Habitat Management

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» Syllabus